American exceptionalism, indeed

December 13, 2016 § Leave a comment

in the early 20th century, the US, with its vigorous and creative legal culture, led the world in racist lawmaking. That was not only true of the Jim Crow South. It was true on the national level as well. The US had race-based immigration law, admired by racists all over the world; and the Nazis, like their Right-wing European successors today (and so many US voters) were obsessed with the dangers posed by immigration.

 

Throughout the early 1930s, the years of the making of the Nuremberg Laws, Nazi policymakers looked to US law for inspiration. Hitler himself, in Mein Kampf (1925), described the US as ‘the one state’ that had made progress toward the creation of a healthy racist society, and after the Nazis seized power in 1933 they continued to cite and ponder US models regularly. They saw many things to despise in US constitutional values, to be sure. But they also saw many things to admire in US white supremacy, and when the Nuremberg Laws were promulgated in 1935, it is almost certainly the case that they reflected direct US influence.

https://aeon.co/ideas/why-the-nazis-studied-american-race-laws-for-inspiration?utm_source=Aeon+Newsletter&utm_campaign=29d4f183a5-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_12_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_411a82e59d-29d4f183a5-68729381

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You are currently reading American exceptionalism, indeed at Wednesday in the Age of Reason-Munchausen (1988).

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